Vaccination rates in the majority of New York’s Haitian neighborhoods are lagging behind the rest of the city, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). With the holiday season’s arrival, some social service groups aim to increase the number of inoculated residents in hopes of curbing the amount of people who might get sick from large gatherings.

“There’s a lot of misinformation out there, and then you have to figure out what people want, why are they so afraid of having this,” said Melinda Placide, development and special projects associate with Haitian Americans United for Progress (HAUP). 

“But once [they] get [vaccinated], they really understand, ‘OK, this is not as bad as I thought it was, and this is for me and the people around me,’” Placide said. 

Pharmacist Serge Dorime delivers a coronavirus vaccine at his Crown Heights pharmacy in March. Photo by Sam Bojarski Vaccination rates in the majority of New York’s Haitian neighborhoods are lagging behind the rest of the city, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). With the holiday […]

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