Rendering of the development planned for 1045 Atlantic Ave.

Plans for a new 17-story, fully electric building to be built on Atlantic Avenue have been unanimously approved by Brooklyn’s Community Board 3.

The building, which will be built between Franklin and Classon Avenues, will include approximately 420 one-to three-bedroom apartments — of which up to 126 will be classified as affordable, New York Yimby reported.

The affordable apartments will be reserved for those that qualify as low- and middle-income, with income caps ranging from 40 to 100 percent area median income (between $42,960 and $107,400 for a family of three).

The building designed by dencityworks will also include more than 34,000 square feet of retail space, 28,000 square feet of office space and 9,000 square feet that will be used as a community childcare facility.

The building is being developed by development firm Totem, alongside the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation and St. Nicks Alliance.

The development will be the first fully electric building in Bed-Stuy, and will include microgrid battery technology that feeds energy back into the local grid. The system will be managed by Microgrid Networks, or MGN, a local business that develops, constructs and operates clean energy generation and storage systems.

Sustainable features will also include wood-composite exterior cladding, multiple green roofs and rainwater collection systems.

Colvin Grannum, president and CEO of Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, said Central Brooklyn was continuing to emerge as a thriving hub for job creation, housing opportunity and general economic development, and this project built on that progress “to help preserve the presence of low- and moderate-income households in Bedford-Stuyvesant.”

“After being an integral part of this community for over 50 years, we have seen how thoughtful, community-focused developments such as 1045 Atlantic can benefit our neighbors in creating much-needed workforce housing.”

Totem Co-founder and Principal Tucker Reed said the developers were “thrilled” to get Community Board 3’s unanimous approval “after more than a year of engagement, collaboration and discussion with area residents and leaders.”

“As we move through the rest of the ULURP process, we will continue working with the community board to deliver a development we can all be proud of; one that provides housing, pedestrian accessibility and safety, green design and jobs.”

The project now be voted on at Borough President Eric Adams’ public ULURP hearing on Wednesday, July 7.

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3

  1. Not one parking space? It is Nearly impossible now to park in this hood – lost spaces to City Bike, bike lanes, etc.
    NYC should mandate Parking Garages!

  2. Sounds great. How does one apply for one of the “affordable apartments”. Is it first come, or a lottery? Anyone know

  3. These high-rises are changing the landscape of the community negatively. From the density to the lack of parking, high cost of living, NYC is becoming increasingly undesirable

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