Merely a month after the Brooklyn Navy Yard outlined its $2.5 billion master plan to bring more open spaces and retail to the area, the manufacturing hub announced its next coup: The $42 million transformation of Building 127, which will add 95,000 square feet of industrial space and more than 300 permanent jobs.

Building 127, located on Morris Avenue between Third and Fourth streets, was originally built for boat construction in 1904 and most recently occupied by Cumberland Sugar Packing before it moved out of the Navy Yard in 2017. The building’s overhaul marks the final renovation of the Yard’s historic buildings.

“The redevelopment of Building 127 will add 300 good-paying jobs and marks a turning point from the redevelopment of our historic buildings to new construction,” said David Ehrenberg, president and CEO of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation. “Thanks to the vision and support of our financial partners, who helped us craft an innovative deal to further our mission of creating high-quality middle-class jobs.”

Building 127. Rendering courtesy S9 Architecture.

Building 127’s transformation will include the reopening and replacing of its oversized windows as well as the installation of new building systems, bathrooms, modernized elevators and renovated loading docks. Upon completion, the new space will offer 30,000-square-foot column-free floor plates and clear floor heights ranging from 20 to 30 feet.

According to BDNY, the ground and second floors will be best suited for a medium-to-large scale manufacturing company, particularly one seeking loading and logistics infrastructure. The third floor, which includes a soaring, open-truss ceiling, will be ideal for a design company seeking a headquarter to develop and showcase prototypes.

S9 Architecture will design the new space; the construction will be managed by Turner Construction Company and is expected to be complete by early 2020.

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Andrea Leonhardt

“Made in Germany,” Andrea Leonhardt is the managing editor for BK Reader. Andrea holds a bachelor’s degree in political science, with minors in American studies and education, and a master’s...

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